Museum of Brisbane

Possum Skin Armband Workshop

  • Sat 1 Jun
  • 2pm - 4pm
  • $25, bookings required
  • The Studio

National Reconciliation Week (27 May – 3 June) is a time for all Australians to learn about our shared histories, cultures and achievements. Join artist Carol McGregor for a family friendly making session based on the tradition of possum skin cloaks.

Possum Skin Armband Workshop with Carol McGregor

National Reconciliation Week (27 May – 3 June) is a time for all Australians to learn about our shared histories, cultures and achievements. Join artist Carol McGregor for a family friendly making session based on the tradition of possum skin cloaks. Learn about the significance of possum skin cloaks as an artform, and as a means to strengthen community and individual identities. Discover painting techniques and create your very own possum skin armband to take home.

Carol McGregor is of Wathaurung (Victoria) and Scottish descent. Through her artistic practice, McGregor explores this rich cultural identity of diverse ancestry and lived experience.

She is currently a Fine Arts Doctorate student at Queensland College of Art, Griffith University, investigating the material culture of possum skin cloaks in South East Queensland (SEQ). McGregor’s research has generated the revitalisation of contemporary possum skin cloak making in SEQ through facilitating workshops with communities.

Suitable for all ages and levels. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Ages 6+

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Possum skin disclaimer
Possums were traditionally used by Aboriginal people as a natural resource for a number of purposes, including material for clothing. In Australia today possum species are protected under the provision of the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1974. The possum skins used for this program were ethically sourced from New Zealand where the culling of possums and overall treatment of the animal are regulated by the New Zealand Society for the Prevention of Cruelty of Animals.

Indigenous design disclaimer
We respect that styles of Aboriginal art and design are part of Indigenous Cultural and Intellectual Property (ICIP). ICIP refers to all the rights that Indigenous people have to protect their traditional arts and culture against cultural and copyright infringement. Our facilitators will guide participants in design if they feel participants are encroaching on this ICIP. More information on ICIP can be found online on the Artists in the Black website (founded by the Arts Law Centre of Australia). More information on Protocols Specific to Indigenous Visual Arts can be found online on the National Association for the Visual Arts website.